Author Topic: Remote Control  (Read 3673 times)

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Offline larsen67

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Remote Control
« on: February 02, 2009, 02:03:50 PM »
Michel or anybody else for that matter, I recall you controlling someone else's mac over the internet. Could you tell me the method in which you went about this. It would be handy if I could access my home mac from work and vise versa. Did you use additional software or built-in stuff that I may have. Would it make any difference what OS these machines are on and what apps are on each? Thanks for any help mean time I will do some searching about…

Offline Publi-Script

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 03:15:45 PM »
I use VNC for that task,

If both your Home and Work Mac are running Leopard, you do not need anything as you can now "Share Screen" with fellow Leopard users. You do need to edit your sharing preferences accordingly though (Preferences > Sharing > Remote Management).

Mind you even with the advent of Leopard I still use JollysFastVNC as a screen reader. You will find more info there on how to use it.

The biggest hurdle you will likely encounter is that you will need to "punch a whole" into your home firewall in order to to have access to your home mac. I personally have a ROUTER/FIREWALL/DHCP SERVER that shares my Cable Internet with all Macs and PCs I have at home. I have setup each computer with its own LAN IP. The trick here is to direct all VNC traffic (normally set to travel on port 5900) to the computer you wish to "overtake".

The reverse can also be true (accessing your work mac from home) but for this you will nedd the help of your IT department to do the Port Forwarding bit.

You will also need to set a VNC Password
You also need to know the current IP address (WAN) of your router (that is the IP address given to you by your ISP). ATTENTION: This IP number can change from time to time. Having these info, you will now be able to access your home mac by typing the following address : RouterIP:Port#.

HTH
Michel Lemieux
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Offline larsen67

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 03:30:37 PM »
Thanks for the info Michel it looks like I will have to give the JollyFastVNC a try as Leopard is not on any mac at work there all Tiger. Sorting the IP's at my end should not prove too much of a problem. Not too sure how the IT people at work will feel when I ask have to give it a try though.

Offline Glenn

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2009, 09:24:33 AM »
Did you get anywhere?

i tried jolly Vast VNC and it was jolly slow for me.

I've a G4 Laptop running 10.4.11 at home, with a 2MB Broadband connection.

I can control PC's at work using Microsoft Remote Desktop and its really fast.
I've been trying 'Chicken of the VNC' to control macs at work. The leopard Mac at work is reasonably quick but the 10.4.11 G5 with 2 monitors is slow still.

What our IT (PC) support couldn't figure out was how to establish a VPN on a mac, I found it in the "Internet Connect" application and then had to figure out whether it was 'L2TP over IPSec' or 'PPTP'. Now its pretty straight forward in the menu bar.

Offline Publi-Script

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2009, 09:43:20 AM »
Hi Glenn,

Broadband is mostly one way: From the Net to your home. Unless you have a dedicated line setup to SERVE stuff (Website, FTP sever, etc.) you will find a slower response when accessing your Home PCs. In fact, most ISP do not want you to be serving stuff and may even cancel your account if they find out you do, other will simply make it difficult (slow) for you to so so.

Personnally, I find it about twice as fast accessing my Work Mac from home than doing the reverse.

My IT guy was confident enough in my Mac's security. Basically all traffic going to a specific port is routed to my work Mac which deals with the password authentication (Set in the Remote Management preference pane).
We never looked at doing it any other way.
Michel Lemieux
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Offline Glenn

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2009, 10:05:09 AM »
Hi Michel
I've only tried VNC at home to control a work computer. My broadband (ISP at home) specifically states I can't have a fixed IP, so I've never tried the other way around. Are you talking about the difference in upload and download speeds with broadband, as in 2MB down 256KB up?

I'm connecting VPN to the work router first and then using VNC to remote control a screen or two, like you said you need to know the external IP for the router and the internal IP for the machine you are taking over.

Offline larsen67

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2009, 10:30:39 AM »
Glenn, you got a lot further than me with this. I installed at both ends no problem then when I asked our IT people who look after both the PC & Mac servers I got a blank look as to why I would want to do this! Still not managed to get our servers external IP so that I can access my works exchange email account on my mobile. Such is life, as I had no joy here did not waist any time trying to sort things at my end. Must admit I was thinking I could just use my broadband connection to do so.

Offline Glenn

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2009, 11:32:10 AM »
Hi Larsen
When I typed 'external IP' mine turned out not to be an actual IP address but a server address of mail.companyname.co.uk the IT PC guy had to set things on the company server to allow "password only" authentication. It all works with my cheapo base package Sky broadband connection at home. I can get my e-mail using the same internal POP settings I use at work, I think it may be different to forward e-mail to a phone, all the directors and sales guys here have flashy 3G phones and blackberrys but i know there were problems getting the e-mail duplicated to them, whenever I have a 40MB pdf to email I always like to cc the sales guy just to test the system ;D

Offline Publi-Script

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2009, 12:46:15 PM »
Hi Michel
I've only tried VNC at home to control a work computer. My broadband (ISP at home) specifically states I can't have a fixed IP, so I've never tried the other way around. Are you talking about the difference in upload and download speeds with broadband, as in 2MB down 256KB up?

Yes that is what I meant... BTW, even though you cannot have a fixed IP at HOME, you can still connect to your home mac from work. In fact that IP does not change that often, and in case it does, I have a wee script that (triggered by a mail rule) that replies me with my current Home IP.
Michel Lemieux
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Offline larsen67

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Re: Remote Control
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2009, 03:38:28 AM »
Glenn, my phone is 3G and I can access email via Safari but it gives me that Microsoft Outlook Web Access I would prefer it to be one of my regular mail accounts. I will keep asking about VNC & VPN so I may well be back here one day asking for more help. Michel what we get dished out as 'broadband' over here is not like what you have your side of the pond. I had to wait 3 years for enough people to register for a cable to be routed to our local exchange. I have not run any speed tests lately but it appeared reasonable when I first got it (should be up to 8mb) although I have noticed a slow down more recently. No Sky for me as I would have no excuse (not that I need one) to go down the pub and watch the football.